Author: Norma

The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers

saldana-textThe Coding Manual gives researchers comprehensive information and examples of codes, coding, and analytic memo writing during qualitative data collection.  32 coding methods are profiled that can be applied to different kinds of research. Readers will learn how to apply codes and themes through exercises and activities. The manual includes samples of field notes, interview transcripts, and other documents. There is also a glossary of analytic recommendations. Any researcher can benefit from the vast amount of information in this book, but it’s particularly useful for those making their first attempts at analyzing qualitative data.

Citation:

Saldana, J. (2010). The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers. London: Sage Publications Ltd.

Digital Ethnography Toward Augmented Empiricism: A New Methodological Framework

While noting the wide variety of digital technologies already in use, Hsu challenges ethnographers to go further. She describes how she uses webscraping to gather data, reveal limitations of software, and gain further information about online communities. Hsu believes the exploration of digital data gathering needs more development. In this article she provides an overview of software methods, mapping, and “seeing textures” in data. Hsu has practical examples of ways ethnographers can use technology—if they are willing to learn some new skills. Her use of mapping and geo-tagging is particularly helpful, since few online communities are confined to a limited geographic area.

Citation:

Hsu, W. (2014). Digital Ethnography Toward Augmented Empiricism: A New Methodological Framework. Journal of Digital Humanities, 3(1). Retrieved from http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/3-1/digital-ethnography-toward-augmented-empiricism-by-wendy-hsu/

Christine Hine on virtual ethnography’s E3 Internet

hine
Photo from University of Surrey

The author conducts an interview with pioneering ethnographer Christine Hine. Hine discusses her theory of the E3 internet: embedded, embodied, and everyday. She also points out the challenges of researchers attempting to quantify experieneces on the web and proposes that new research strategies are needed for studying online communities and the internet as a whole. At the time of this interview, Hine was interested in following connections across sites rather than concentrating on a single online location. In true Hine form, multiple readings will likely be required to understand everything she says.

Citation:

Ford, H. (2013, November 29). Christine Hine on virtual ethnography’s E3 Internet [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://ethnographymatters.net/blog/2013/11/29/christine-hine-on-virtual-ethnographys-e3-internet/.

Tell Me More danah boyd: an interview with the author of “It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens”

Photo from danahboyd.org

In this interview, danah boyd talks about the issues that prompted her to present her ethnographic findings to the tech community at SXSW. During her research, boyd discovered a disconnect between the way sites and apps were being created and the way they were being used. She says there is a disconnect between knowing data can be gathered from users and understanding how to interpret it. boyd also discusses her background and her plans to launch the Data & Society Research Institute. While this interview is a few years old, the issues boyd talks about are more important now than ever. She also reveals a surprise research tool.

Citation:

Wang, T. (2014, February 26). Tell Me More danah boyd: an interview with the author of “It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens” [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://ethnographymatters.net/blog/2014/02/26/tell-me-more-danah-boyd-an-interview-with-the-author-of-its-complicated-the-social-lives-of-networked-teens/

Amber Case: we are all cyborgs now

Cyborg anthropologist Amber Case explains how humans are already cyborgs—that by virtue of using computers and mobile devices, we have external brains. Case argues that all tool use is a modification of self, designed to help humans do things better. However, Case points out that we are now experiencing not modification of physical self, but of mental self. She also points out that we now have “second selfs” that exist online and can be interacted with, even when we are not present. This TED Talk is thought provoking in that it reminds the viewer that time away from technology is an important part of being able to use the tools now available to present an authentic digital self.

Citation:

[TED]. (2011, January 11). Amber Case: we are all cyborgs now. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1KJAXM3xYA